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Education Matters

I Feel...Picture Books to Help with Emotional Well-Being

February 24th, 2014

Submitted by Jill Griffith, Youth Services Manager at Red Deer Public Library 

A simple definition of emotional intelligence is the ability to understand our own feelings and the feelings of others so we can get along with other people. Experts have found that our emotional intelligence is the biggest predictor of life happiness.  Emotional intelligence in children is said to lead to better behavior, better performance in school, and better social skills.  At Red Deer Public Library, we often see parents who are looking for resources to help children cope with their developing emotions, and staff recently created a list of picture books that parents and children can read together to talk about and understand their feelings.   As an added bonus, the simple act of reading together helps the parent and child bond, make children feel more secure, and increases a child’s feeling of self-worth, according to How to Raise a Reader.

When Lions Roar by Chris Raschka      

A caring and reassuring story of a young child who faces his fear and makes his world a safe place again. A comforting story for young readers when their world becomes unsettled.

How Do Dinosaurs Say I’m Mad by Jane Yolen      

R-O-A-R! What happens when little dinosaurs get mad? And how do they calm down? Brimming with humour, this new book handles a timeless children's topic with wit and wisdom

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The Way I Feel by Janan Cain      

Illustrations and rhyming text portray children experiencing a range of emotions, including frustration, shyness, jealousy, and pride.

Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon by Patty Lovell         

When Molly Lou has to start in a new school, Ronald Durkin makes fun of her height and her buck teeth. But Molly has learned a lot from her grandma and knows just how to put him in place--in a very satisfying way.

Today I Feel Silly & Other Moods That Make My Day by Jamie Lee Curtis

A child's emotions range from silliness to anger to excitement, colouring and changing each day.

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